Norwegian Defense: 10 Reasons to Add it to Your PreparationCreating a repertoire for black is usually a challenge, as your opponent is the one who’s setting the pace and can decide what type of positions to go for. If you are still struggling with putting yours together, then this article is for you! One very interesting option you might want to take a look at if you’re working on a repertoire is an opening that’s been gaining a lot of popularity, the Modern Defense.

We have discussed its advantages in the past and today we’re going to look at one particular line inside it – the Norwegian Defense, also known as the North Sea Variation.

If you don’t know what this is all about, you might want to check it out, since it could be a good addition to your repertoire for a few reasons:

1.It allows you to take the game in the desired direction

Being able to push the game towards positions you feel most comfortable with as black is an important feature! If you are an attacking player who likes complications, you might have found it difficult to reach the desired positions without some cooperation from your opponent’s side. Here, you can get the types of positions you like without much trouble.

2.It can come as a big surprise to your opponent

The usual scenario for most chess players is to prepare and know very well the main lines and the openings they face most. As this is not a main-stream opening, your opponents will most likely be less equipped to meet it and could go wrong early in the game.

3.Not much classical theory

The theory is not very well developed, which means you won’t have to learn by heart huge files of never-ending lines. You can learn it by seeing many games and understanding the main ideas and set-ups you are aiming for.

4.Easy to complicate the game

The game can get complicated early on since black is already offering a pawn on move 4 in return for the initiative and attack. If white doesn’t know exactly what they’re doing, the thing could get dangerous very soon.

5. A lot of room for creativity

The not so well-developed theory in this line shows that there is so much left to explore and it leaves a lot of room for creativity. If you study the positions in-depth, you will surely find interesting and dangerous plans that are not easy to meet over the board for someone who hasn’t seen those positions before.

6.Great as a surprise weapon

It is a great choice for games with fast time-control. The time factor could be a great advantage for you if you already know what you’re doing. For someone who meets this opening for the first time, for example, the chances to go wrong are very big, especially with little time on the clock.

7.Top players approved

It has been the choice of some very strong players, who are well-known for having a varied repertoire that includes less theoretical, but dangerous lines. One of the specialists is Richard Rapport, but this opening has also made it to Magnus Carlsen’s repertoire, who has used it mostly in rapid and blitz games.

8.Positional middlegame, if white survives the opening

If white doesn’t enter the complications (which usually favor black), you get good, solid positions where black is usually doing fine. The middlegames involve a lot of maneuvering and could turn into a long, positional battle, where you can slowly outplay your opponent.

9.Can be played against both 1.e4 and 1.d4

It is a universal opening that can be employed against both 1.e4 and 1.d4, a detail that will ease your work in the opening a lot. It is ambitious and dynamic and can offer black good play.

10.Fun opening

Last but not least, it is an opening where you can have a lot of fun. You can experiment with new plans, but can also unleash beautiful and dangerous attacks.

Ready to learn the Norwegian Defense?

If you’re ready to learn this opening and start CRUSHING the poor souls who try to “refute” it, our friend FM Yuriy Krykun has a brand new course for you.

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